Tag: Fiscal transfers

Zombie Federalism Two: Following the money to the usual places

My recent post on the controversial history surrounding the regional impacts of federal government taxing and spending promised to address claims by the National Post that the Trudeau Liberals are courting votes in Atlantic Canada with “Cadillac handouts.” The accusation stemmed from a single piece of data – that in 2019 federal spending in Atlantic Canada exceeded revenue collected by the equivalent of $6,400 per capita. The simple answer to whether that factoid proves the Liberals are spending big in this region to shore up electoral support is “no.” In fact, the dataset from which the 64-hundred-dollar exposé was...

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Zombie federalism on the prowl again: Part One

John Quiggins’ 2010 book, Zombie Economics: How Dead Ideas Still Walk Among Us describes how neoliberal economic ideas that should died with the Great Recession of 2007-8 continue to live on. Readers of the Chronicle-Herald and the National Post have recently been exposed to something similar: zombie fiscal federalism, an ungenerous view of the country from the distant past that should have stayed buried. The outbreak of zombie fiscal federalism made the opinion section of the Herald on April 24. A full-page article by David MacKinnon, with the headline, “Economic Reality Will Wreck our East Coast sand castle” reported...

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Post-budget advice to feds: Show us the health care money

There was a lot packed into the 740 page near $500-billion federal budget tabled last Monday. Somebody counted 230 new spending proposals, the largest of which is the $30-billion over five years for childcare. That’s an important, long-overdue commitment but it wasn’t the most noteworthy thing about the budget. The big story is what’s missing from the longest, most postponed and verbose budget in Canada’s history. Notable in their absence were increased health transfers to the provinces and national pharmacare, while elder care was barely in evidence. To that big three of health care can be added proposals that...

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Update on health transfers: Conservative do a flip flop

Any momentum towards an improved deal on federal health transfers to the provinces seems to be slowing. First it was the Justin Trudeau government telling the provinces to wait. And now it seems the official opposition Conservatives are losing their enthusiasm for a sizeable increase in transfer payments. In an interview last week with Brunswick News, Conservative leader Erin O’Toole refused to be pinned down to a dollar or percentage increase in transfers. This represented an about-face from the startling position taken earlier by the deputy leader of the Conservatives, discussed here. Back in October, Manitoba MP Candice Bergen...

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Health transfer issue returns, wrangling to follow

The pandemic has changed some aspects of the political landscape and may affect many more. One thing that’s different is the debate about federal health transfers to the provinces. Although likely to be subject to political wrangling, an improved formula may be coming. This site is full of articles about this subject, but to save looking them up, here is a summary of the saga. Between 2004 and 2016 health transfers increased at the rate of six percent a year. In 2017, in a change imposed by the Harper Conservatives, the increase was capped at the lesser of three...

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Richard Starr, The man behind the Point

About Richard

RICHARD STARR has had careers as a journalist, public servant, broadcaster, political staffer and freelance policy adviser. He is author of numerous newspaper and magazine articles, a former radio and TV producer and weekly newspaper editor, and the author of three non-fiction books. Starr has lived in Dartmouth for more than 30 years.

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