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Righting Canada's Wrongs: Japanese Canadian Internment in the Second World War
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Righting Canada's Wrongs: Japanese Canadian Internment in the Second World War

By Pamela Hickman and Masako Fukawa

$34.95 Hardback
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Series: Righting Canada's Wrongs

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This book is an illustrated history of the wartime internment of Japanese Canadian residents of British Columbia. At the time when Japan attacked Pearl Harbor, Japanese Canadians numbered well over 20,000. From the first arrivals in the late nineteenth century, they had taken up work in many parts of BC, established communities, and become part of the Canadian society even though they faced racism and prejudice in many forms.

With war came wartime hysteria. Japanese Canadian residents of BC were rounded up, their homes and property seized, and forced to move to internment camps with inadequate housing, water, and food. Men and older boys went to road camps while some families ended up on farms where they were essentially slave labour. Eventually, after years of pressure, the Canadian government admitted that the internment was wrong and apologized for it.

This book uses a wide range of historical photographs, documents, and images of museum artefacts to tell the story of the internment. The impact of these events is underscored by first-person narrative from five Japanese Canadians who were themselves youths at the time their families were forced to move to the camps.

Contents

Acknowledgements

Introduction

Chapter 1: Coming to Canada

Seeking a Better Future
Who Were the Immigrants?
Why Canada?
A Very British Society

Chapter 2: Japanese Canadians in BC, 1900–1939

Starting Out
Women's Work
Success and Independence
Fear of Immigrants
Racist Treatment
Racial Segregation
Steveston
Powell Street, Vancouver
Sticking Together
A Visible Minority
Japanese Culture
Language Schools

Chapter 3: War

Canada Goes to War
Japanese Canadians Join the War Effort
Canada Goes to War Against Japan

Chapter 4: Enemy Allies

Japanese-Canadian Citizens Lose Their Rights
Normal Life Comes to a Halt
The New Canadian
The Decision to Intern
Forced Removal
Women and Children Held in Livestock Stables
Property Seizure

Chapter 5: Internment and Forced Labour

Internment Camps
Twelve Years Old in Lemon Creek
A High-School Student in Greenwood
New Denver
Road Camp and Prison Camp
Camp Baseball
Forced Labour on the Prairies
Speaking Out Against Internment
Japanese Canadians Join the War

Chapter 6: Aftermath

Voluntary Deportation
Relocation East of the Rockies
Return to the Coast
Post-war Life for Japanese Canadians

Chapter 7: Acknowledging the Past

Fight for Apology and Redress
Permanent Acknowledgements

Timeline

Glossary

For Further Reading

Visual Credits

Index

Awards

Commended - Best Books for Kids & Teens -- Canadian Children's Book Centre - 2012

Commended - One of the Year's Best for 2012 -- Resource Links - 2012

Japanese Canadian Internment in the Second World War is a phenomenal achievement. More than 300 full-colour and black and white visuals (maps, photos, document facsimiles) powerfully evoke the times they represent, the personal stories give a strong and poignant voice to those who lived the experience, and the combination of historical content and first-person accounts make this a hugely accessible work for high school students in Canadian history and human rights courses. This book has a place, both in high school libraries and as a supplementary text for social studies classrooms.
Highly Recommended

- Joanne Peters CM: Canadian Review of Materials

"For high school instructors--especially those seeking primary soruce documetns to have students analyze--this is a treasure-trove."

- George Sheppard, Canadian Teacher

Authors Pamela Hickman and Masako Fukawa skilfully follow the story of the Japanese in Canada, from the first wave of immigrants in 1877 through the internment years and the fight for redress. Arresting images dominate the pages, mixing family photographs, posters, museum artifacts, and news archives to create a vivid scrapbook, which also contains the recollections of five internment survivors. Their accounts, peppered generously throughout the book, bring to life the imagery and facts that might otherwise seem impersonal....The book proves an essential history lesson for a generation that may be unaware of this deplorable part of our nation's past.

- Cynthia O'Brien Quill & Quire

"an effective educational volume"

- BC Bookworld

"This book is very well-done... The visuals are spectacular and will surely be a drawing card for students... These are topics our students need to be informed about in order to understand and appreciate our history." Rated E - Excellent, enduring, everyone should see it!

- Victoria Pennell Resource Links

"...inviting like a yearbook or a highly polished scrapbook, bursting with photos as well as historic political cartoons and posters...The inclusion of simple maps, a detailed timeline and a glossary also contribute to the readability of this large-format volume...This book holds appeal for any young adult with an interest in the history of Canada."

- Evan A. Mackay Nikkei Voice

About the Righting Canada's Wrongs series:
"As indicated by its name, this series is hopeful. It is not about opening old wounds; it's about remembering the past, understanding it and moving forward."

- Evan A. MacKay Nikkei Voice

"This is an impressive book filled with heart-wrenching stories of Japanese Canadians who endured this difficult period in their lives. It is a must have for all history teachers as it recognizes an event in Canadian history that should never be repeated."

- Sandra O'Brien Canadian Children's Book News

MASAKO FUKAWA lived in Steveston, BC until the forced evacuation in 1942. Masako has worked as a teacher and principal. Her recent book, , won the 2010 Canada-Japan Literary Award and was runner up for the 2010 Bill Duthie Booksellers' Choice Award and the BC Historical Federation's 2009 Historical Writing Competition. She lives in Burnaby, BC.
PAMELA HICKMAN is the author of over 35 non-fiction books for children, including winners of the Green Award for Sustainable Literature, International Best Book Award, Society of School Librarians, Canadian Authors Association Lilla Stirling Memorial Award and Parent's Choice Award. She lives in Canning, Nova Scotia.

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Publication Details:

Binding: Hardback, 160 pages
Publication Date: 21st February 2012
ISBN: 9781552778531
Format: 11in x 9in

BISAC Code:  4.0.2.0.2.0.0, YAN025050, YAN051090, YAN051180
Imprint: Lorimer

Interest age: From 13 To 18

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Series Website

Series features

  • Voices and stories of those who were affected
  • Geared to support history and civics curriculums
  • Full-colour images of period artifacts, maps, documents and historic photographs
  • Teachers Resource Guide prepared by the Critical Thinking Consortium
"As indicated by its name, this series is hopeful. It is not about opening old wounds; it's about remembering the past, understanding it and moving forward." Nikkei Voice

Righting Canada's Wrongs is a series devoted to the exploration of the Canadian government's actions that violated the rights of groups of Canadian citizens, the subsequent fight for acknowledgement and justice, and the eventual apologies and restitution by governments.